33 Examples of the Adjectival Clause

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I am about to give you lots of examples of the adjectival clause.

But before I do that, let me show you a summary of the characteristics of what qualifies to be called an adjectival clause.

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First, an adjectival clause, like other types of subordinate clauses, is usually a group of words.

Secondly, any time a group of words is qualifying a noun/noun phrase/noun clause then it must be an adjectival clause.

Finally, a group of words that begins with any of the following relative pronouns could be a good example of the adjectival clause.

who

whom

which

whose

that (provided that it is replaceable by who/which/whom in the sentence in question)

Examples of the adjectival clause

You can now have your examples of the adjectival clause. Note that I use every one of them in a sentence. The adjectival clause is what appears in bold lettering.

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I want to group them according to the subordinating conjunctions that introduce them.

WHO

  • The people who lived here were fishermen.
  • Joyce is the girl who came first in the test.
  • Worshipers who left early never met the priest.
  • Bloggers who do not quit easily are the ones who eventually succeed.
  • Tell the women who brought her home I appreciate their kind gesture.
  • Do you know anything about those who staged the demonstration?
  • I warned her to be wary of any man who promised her heaven and earth.
  • You must report the student who stole your book to the authorities.

WHOM

  • This is the little girl whom you spoke about.
  • They are the only friends whom I can trust.
  • Uche is the name of the gentleman whom she met in Port Harcourt.
  • Olu Jacobs is the actor whom we all admire.
  • Kamara definitely knows the trader whom he bought the goods from.

WHICH

  • That is the same computer which I used several years ago.
  • The incident which led to Baby T’s death is shrouded in mystery.
  • He wants to live in a city which has a very low crime rate.
  • Is that not the book which I gave you?
  • There are rivers which date back to Mesopotamian times.
  • The few flowers which once decorated the compound have all disappeared .
  • It killed any other animal which came its way.
  • Let me see the question which is giving you so much trouble.

WHOSE

  • Appiah is the boy whose feet got burnt.
  • Ministers whose views clashed with the president’s have all resigned.
  • Ghana is the country whose citizens are not allowed to have a PayPal account.
  • These are the girls whose parents have been missing.

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THAT

  • The people that lived in darkness have found a great light.
  • She is my sister that I mentioned to you on several occasions.
  • Here is the cat that ate all the fish.
  • Show me the place that is more dangerous than this town.
  • You are the person that we’ve been looking for.

ZERO RELATIVE

In this case, the relative pronoun is absent but implied. You can introduce which, whom or that into the examples below.

  • She followed the woman I came with. (She followed the woman WHOM I came with.)
  • I can name the food you ate this afternoon. ( I can name the food WHICH/THAT you ate this afternoon.)
  • Kofi can’t find the pencil we gave him. (Kofi can’t find the pencil WHICH/THAT we gave him. )

Don’t be shy. Give us one example of the adjectival clause in the comment field below.

Thank you.

 

Ralph Nyadzi spends his day working as an online educator, a freelance website designer, web content manager and WordPress trainer. Ralph is the CEO of RN Digital Media Ent. He blogs on CegastAcademy.com and BloggingtotheMax!

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