Scene Four Summary of Harvest of Corruption

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In our summary of Scene Three of Frank Ogodo Ogbeche’s play, Harvest of Corruption, we see the bizarre manner in which Justice Odili dismisses the drug case against Aloho “for want of evidence”.

In this Scene Four summary of Harvest of Corruption we will see a a follow-up to the events that unfolded in the previous scene.

Are you ready for a concise summary of Scene Four of Harvest of Corruption?

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FRANK OGODO OGBECHE: HARVEST OF CORRUPTION – SUMMARY OF SCENE FOUR

There are two main parts of Scene Four of Harvest of Corruption.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE: The most likely examination questions on Harvest of Corruption.

Let’s begin, naturally, with the first part.

 

Aloho has been released from police custody, her drug trafficking case having been thrown out of court by Justice Odili “for want of evidence”.

Back in Ogeyi’s room, Aloho is very much disturbed.

Aloho can’t stop weeping.

Aloho keeps expressing shock at her release “for want of evidence” despite glaring compelling evidence to the contrary

She bemoans the endemic corruption in Jabu, in particular, and Jacassa in general.

This is the only explanation for her release. Chief Haladu Ade-Amaka’s influence and money have played a big role in Aloho’s release.

Aloho reveals to Ogeyi that she is pregnant for Chief Haladu Ade-Amaka.

Aloho tells Ogeyi she will abort the pregnancy.

“This harvest is too much for me and I just cannot store it up.”

Aloho expresses remorse for not heeding Ogeyi’s warnings at the beginning and for letting down her family. They have had great expectations of her.

Ogeyi, in her characteristic manner,  admonishes Aloho to forgive herself and move on with life.

 

“Calm down Aloho, the world has not ended, you can still pick up the pieces.”

 

 

A Summarized Version of the Second Part of Scene Four of Harvest of Corruption.

ACP Yakubu goes to meet his superior officer, the Commissioner of Police in his office.

ACP Yakubu tells the Commissioner of Police that it is in the national interest to take up the 1.2 billion naira embezzlement allegation against the Honourable Minister, External Relations, Chief Haladu Ade-Amaka.

He intimates that he is not willing to see this embezzlement case go the way the “airport drug case” involving Aloho had gone.

There and then, the Commissioner of Police tries to intimidate and silence ACP Yakubu.

However, ACP Yakubu, being the man of integrity that he is, stands his ground.

“Sir! I cannot be intimidated. I know my job too and I know my limitations as well. What I am telling you is that this man, Chief Haladu Ade-Amaka or whatever he is called, the entire Ministry and in fact all the other Ministries as well need to be investigated. But if you think otherwise, I shall have no other alternative than to go ahead and do what I want to do. Period!”

When the Commissioner of Police keeps threatening him, ACP Yakubu advises his corrupt superior officer to begin putting his house in order before it is too late.

“Sir, you cannot threaten me and do not bother at what hits me, but I shall ask you this: since only those who have skeletons need fear (He lowers his face to him). Sir, do you have any skeletons in your cupboard? Well, as a friend, I have come to warn you to start some sanitation exercise on it because these Boys will open the cupboard so wide that the skeleton will not only smell, it will stink.”

At this stage, the Commissioner of Police is visibly scared. He tries to plead with ACP Yakubu to reconsider his position on the matter but the latter storms out of the office.

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Take me to Scene Two summary of Harvest of Corruption.

 

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